Animal Healing Conference Veterinary Hospital, First Aid for Horses, Foaling
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First Aid for Horses

FOALING

Although all foalings are not emergencies, there are certain situations which are critical and require prompt veterinary attention, especially with the life of a new foal at stake!

The mare should foal within 30 minutes of the water breaking. If she has been in hard labor for 15 minutes with no results, call your veterinarian.

The foal should emerge front feet first, with the soles of the feet pointing downwards, and the nose resting on the knees. Make sure both feet are protruding from the vulva, and note the anus.

After the entire foal has been expelled, remove the membranes from the foal's nose and make sure the nostrils are clean. Then let the mare and foal rest quietly. The foal may receive up to an extra quart of blood from the mare before the umbilical cord breaks.

After a normal foaling you should contact your veterinarian to check the mare and foal after about 12 hours to check for congenital problems, damage to the mare, and to ensure that the foal got an adequate supply of colostrum.
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